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Atsena Therapeutics Receives Rare Pediatric Disease Designation from FDA for ATSN-101 Gene Therapy for GUCY2D-associated Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA1)

Atsena Therapeutics Receives Rare Pediatric Disease Designation from FDA for ATSN-101 Gene Therapy for GUCY2D-associated Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA1)

Positive 12-month safety and efficacy data from ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial of ATSN-101 to be presented at 47th Annual Macula Society Meeting on February 7, 2024

DURHAM, NC, January 16, 2024 – Atsena Therapeutics, a clinical-stage gene therapy company focused on bringing the life-changing power of genetic medicine to reverse or prevent blindness, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Rare Pediatric Disease (RPD) designation to ATSN-101, the company’s investigational gene therapy being evaluated in an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by biallelic mutations in GUCY2D (LCA1). The FDA previously granted Regenerative Medicine Advanced Therapy (RMAT) designation and orphan drug designation to ATSN-101 for the treatment of LCA1.

RPD designation is granted by the FDA for serious or life-threatening diseases which affect fewer than 200,000 people in the United States and in which the serious or life-threatening manifestations primarily affect individuals less than 18 years of age. If a Biologics License Application for ATSN-101 for the treatment of LCA1 is approved by the FDA, Atsena may be eligible to receive a Priority Review Voucher that can be redeemed to receive a priority review for any subsequent marketing application or may be sold or transferred.

“Rare Pediatric Disease designation is a significant milestone for our LCA1 program as we explore options to advance ATSN-101 into a pivotal clinical trial,” said Patrick Ritschel, MBA, Chief Executive Officer of Atsena Therapeutics. “The FDA designations that have been granted to ATSN-101 not only emphasize the tremendous need for a treatment for patients with LCA1, but also the potential for our subretinal gene therapy to be a major advance in reversing pediatric blindness.”

Positive 12-month safety and efficacy data from the company’s ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial of ATSN-101 will be presented at the 47th Annual Macula Society Meeting, which is being held February 7-10, 2024, in Palm Springs, CA. ATSN-101 has demonstrated clinically meaningful improvements in vision at the highest dose and is well-tolerated 12 months post-treatment. Details of the presentation are as follows:

Title: Twelve-month safety and efficacy of ATSN-101 in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by biallelic mutations in GUCY2D (LCA1)
Session: Inherited Retinal Dystrophy I (Treatment Trials)
Date and Time: Wednesday, February 7, 2024, 6:04 p.m. PST
Presenter: Christine Nichols Kay, MD

About GUCY2D-associated Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA1)
LCA1 is a monogenic eye disease that disrupts the function of the retina. It is caused by mutations in the GUCY2D gene and results in early and severe vision impairment or blindness. GUCY2D-LCA1 is one of the most common forms of LCA, affecting roughly 20 percent of patients who live with this group of inherited retinal diseases. There are currently no approved treatments for LCA1.

About Atsena Therapeutics
Atsena Therapeutics is a clinical-stage gene therapy company developing novel treatments for inherited forms of blindness. The company has two clinical-stage programs, ATSN-201 for X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and ATSN-101 for GUCY2D-associated Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA1). ATSN-201, which leverages the company’s novel spreading capsid AAV.SPR, is being evaluated in XLRS patients in a Phase I/II clinical trial known as the LIGHTHOUSE study. The company’s additional proprietary asset is ATSN-301, a dual AAV vector-based gene therapy to prevent blindness from MYO7A-associated Usher syndrome (USH1B). Interim safety and efficacy data from the company’s ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with LCA1 have demonstrated ATSN-101 is well tolerated and clinically meaningful improvements in vision were observed 12 months post-treatment. Founded by ocular gene therapy pioneers Dr. Shannon Boye and Sanford Boye of the University of Florida, Atsena is based in North Carolina’s Research Triangle, an environment rich in gene therapy expertise. For more information, please visit atsenatx.com.

Media Contact:
Tony Plohoros
6 Degrees
(908) 591-2839
tplohoros@6degreespr.com

Business Contact:
info@atsenatx.com

 

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